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Giving thanks

 
Yesterday Asa had an exam under anaesthetic at the Royal London Hospital.

tearing up the waiting room


There was a long wait while he was in the operating theatre. And when Selam picked him up from the recovery room, his right eye was red and swollen.
           
Had the IAM not worked again? 

Perhaps they'd used cryo instead -- which causes swelling…?

A turn of events

When the doctors came around to debrief, they were upbeat:

"We're happy with the way he responded to the IAM," they said. 

The tumours they’d seen last time had "flattened out" since the second dose of IAM, they explained.

They had used cyrotherapy -- but that was to treat a small area on the roof of the eye.


Asa in regulation kimono



This is a huge relief.

As soon as a space is available on the list, they'll proceed with a third dose of IAM -- probably either next Wednesday or the following week.

Counting our blessings

Today Americans are celebrating Thanksgiving.

I’m in the US right now -- to attend an anthropology conference in San Francisco and an African studies conference in Philadelphia.

But today I’m spending time with relatives in Alabama.

I just skyped with Selam and Asa, and both of them looked well.

We have much to be thankful for!

Comments

  1. That's great that the medical protocol seems to be working, but I know it must be terribly nervewracking! I'm sorry I won't be at ASA this year to catch up with you- enjoy your time back in the US!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Andrea! I'll miss you at the ASAs. Great to see how well Charlotte's doing.

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