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Reassurance

Yesterday I wrote to our doctor to ask what the neuro specialists had said at the Multi-Disciplinary Meeting, on viewing Asa's MRI scans.

Did the meeting throw up any new information on what might be behind the head pain? 

And what was the implication of the gliosis that had showed up in the MRI?

The doctor's reply:
No - the scan was not thought to show any cause for his head pain – the area of gliosis is very small and non-specific and is probably related to minor trauma ?during delivery and is definitely not the cause of his pain.

One of the nurse practitioners wondered if the pain could be a manifestation of migraine which is sometime seen in 2-3 year olds.  However, we will check the IO [intra-ocular] pressure in the left eye at his EUA to rule out glaucoma first.

We're greatly reassured by this.

The question of what's causing Asa's head pain remains, but we're steadily eliminating some of the scarier possibilities. 

The next EUA is on Wednesday, 17 July.

For now, we're making the most of our freedom -- and a recent spell of good weather.

On the Millennium Bridge, July 10, 2013

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