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New hope

In the past week, Selam and I sought advice from every channel open to us on what might be done to save Asa's sight and minimise collateral damage from treatment.

We made phone-calls and wrote emails; we read scientific papers about the long-term impacts of radiotherapy; and on Sunday we went to our local Quaker meeting and asked for guidance on how to proceed.

To recap, Asa's predicament is as follows: He has had a relapse in his right eye, and a cataract has deprived him of sight in his left eye.

The choice we'd been offered was between radiation therapy, with the corollary of increased risk of other cancers in adulthood, or removing both eyes.

But the emailing and phone-calling paid off.

The experts we'd consulted -- in the USA, Canada, and Switzerland -- didn't feel that radiation was necessary, and on that basis the London team recommended a full review in Birmingham.

Asa was examined at Birmingham Children's Hospital -- the UK's other dedicated Rb centre -- on Friday.

And yesterday morning we were able to go to the Quaker meeting again, and share our joy: That a new set of possibilities had opened up in terms of treatment.

While much uncertainty remains, the choice before us is no longer so stark.

In short, there's new reason for hope.



Thank you to everyone who offered us advice, encouragement, or prayers.

On September 20th, Selam, Jed, and Asa will walk across London at night in support of eye cancer research. Please sponsor them here.

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